Christians and the myth of the “hookup culture”

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History[ edit ] The rise of hookups, a form of casual sex , has been described by evolutionary biologist Justin Garcia and others as a “cultural revolution” that had its beginnings in the s. Lisa Wade, a sociologist, documents that 19th century white fraternity men often had what would be called hookup sex with prostitutes, poor women, and the women they had enslaved. As a result, Garcia and other scholars argue that young adults are able to reproduce physiologically but are not psychologically or socially ready to ‘settle down’ and begin a family. Research on hookups is not seated within a singular disciplinary sphere; it sits at the crossroads of theoretical and empirical ideas drawn from a diverse range of fields, including psychology , anthropology , sociology , biology , medicine , and public health. It is hard to make sense of the hookup culture with understanding why it exists in society and why individuals participate in the culture. Boodram, “hooking up is nothing more than settling; it is the microwaveable burrito of sex. It can range from acts that involve kissing, oral sex, or intercourse. A hook up is an act that involves sexual intimacy, claimed by many to be a sexually liberating act. On the other hand, hook up culture is thought to be oppressive and monolithic, with intimacy only occurring within a specific context. Currier, she explores how the phrase “hooking up” conveys different meanings depending on whether a man or woman uses it when describing their sexual encounters; furthermore, Currier notes that men use “hooking up” to emphasize their masculinity and heterosexuality whereas women use the phrase to preserve their femininity by being strategically ambiguous in order to downplay their sexual desires.

Studying the factors of the hookup culture

RSS link Few topics send the media into a panic like the idea of hookup culture on college campuses. But are college students actually having more sex than their parents did a generation ago? Research suggests the answer is no. Lisa Wade, a sociologist at Occidental College, says something has changed, though: In today’s hookup culture, developing an emotional attachment to a casual sex partner is one of the biggest breaches of social norms.

For her new book, American Hookup:

The acknowledgment and recognition of said culture, however, varies greatly.

History[ edit ] The rise of hookups, a form of casual sex , has been described by evolutionary biologist Justin Garcia and others as a “cultural revolution” that had its beginnings in the s. As a result, Garcia and other scholars argue that young adults are able to reproduce physiologically but are not psychologically or socially ready to ‘settle down’ and begin a family. Research on hookups is not seated within a singular disciplinary sphere; it sits at the crossroads of theoretical and empirical ideas drawn from a diverse range of fields, including psychology, anthropology, sociology, biology, medicine, and public health.

It is hard to make sense of the hookup culture with understanding why it exists in society and why individuals participate in the culture. Boodram, “hooking up is nothing more than settling; it is the microwaveable burrito of sex. The term’s definition can vary depending on the person or on the age group. It can range from acts that involve kissing, oral sex, or intercourse.

A hook up is an act that involves sexual intimacy, claimed by many to be a sexually liberating act. On the other hand, hook up culture is thought to be oppressive and monolithic, with intimacy only occurring within a specific context. Currier, she explores how the phrase “hooking up” conveys different meanings depending on whether a man or woman uses it when describing their sexual encounters; furthermore, Currier notes that men use “hooking up” to emphasize their masculinity and heterosexuality whereas women use the phrase to preserve their femininity by being strategically ambiguous in order to downplay their sexual desires.

This Is UChicago Hookup Culture

Media reports characterize the college experience by “a new and pervasive hookup culture in which students regularly have sex with no strings attached,” said study co-author and Martin Monto, a sociology professor at the University of Portland. Advertisement “This implies that the college campus has become a more sexualized environment and that undergraduates are having more sex than in the past,” he added.

Then they compared responses from with those from , an era often described by a “hookup culture,” he said. Among the cohort, In terms of attitudes toward other sexual norms, the researchers found that contemporary university students were no more accepting than those in the earlier cohort of sex between the ages of 14 and 16, married adults having affairs, or premarital sex between adults. But contemporary college students were significantly more accepting of sex between adults of the same sex.

Sex workers , because of their infrequent condom use, high rates of sexually transmitted infections STIs , and other factors, are also considered to be at risk.

Reviews Availability When it comes to intimacy and sex, young people today are apparently doing away with the old rules of romance and cutting straight to the chase. If recent reports are to be believed, the rise of hookup culture on college campuses is in the process of killing off dating and courtship, radically altering some of our most basic assumptions about heterosexual sex and gender. But for all the speculation, there’s been little beyond anecdotal evidence to back any of these claims up.

This lecture by Stanford University’s Paula England, a leading researcher in the sociology of gender, aims to clarify what’s actually going on. England mobilizes a wealth of data to begin to chart whether the phenomenon of hooking up represents some kind of fundamental change, or whether we’re simply seeing age-old gender patterns dressed up in new social forms. Jason Young Camera Operators: Andrew Killoy Production Assistant: Her research focuses on gender inequality in labor markets, and on how changes in family life are affected by the gender and class systems.

She is a former editor of the American Sociological Review. It does not engage in moralizing, nor should it. The film should motivate some interesting discussion and questions, and it may also contribute to the wider American dialog about not just what college students and young singles are doing but what we want them to do and what social, emotional, and physical consequences their choices make.

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She is the author of God and the Victim: Her research interests include trauma theory and Christian theology; ethnography and Christian ethics; sexual ethics; feminist ethics; and children, justice, and Catholicism. College Hookup Culture and Christian Ethics The Lives and Longings of Emerging Adults Jennifer Beste Reviews and Awards “College Hookup Culture and Christian Ethics weaves together original ethnographic research, theological reflection on full human living and loving, and a justice-oriented analysis of sexual norms and campus culture in a way that is engaging, insightful, and thought-provoking even if, at times, it is also unsettling and uncomfortable

Victims fear that their anonymity may be compromised and, when it is, they could be subject to the wrath of those who liken athletes to gods.

Health and law expert: NFL not alone in handling concussions as ‘benign’ problems David Orentlicher Print-Quality Photo More than 2, former football players are suing the National Football League, saying the league should have taken action earlier to deal with injuries related to concussions more seriously. But if a lack of speed in tackling concussions warrants criticism, the NFL isn’t the only player deserving a penalty, according to a study co-authored by health care and law expert David Orentlicher, who teaches at Indiana University Robert H.

McKinney School of Law in Indianapolis. Neurologists were also slow in sounding the alarm, and for decades, concussions were viewed as a “benign phenomenon,” according to Orentlicher. Orentlicher’s study “Concussion and Football: David of Harvard Medical School, traces the evolution of the medical understanding of concussion over the past several decades. If many medical experts did not worry about concussions, it is difficult to fault the NFL for not worrying either.

University of michigan hookup culture !

Among all undergraduates surveyed in the study, not a single student said that they felt their peers valued saving sex for marriage, and only 7 percent said that their friends valued saving sex for committed, loving relationships. This perception of a casual undergraduate approach to sex appears to be supported by research from the American College Health Association. Students from the same survey also reported having an average of only one sexual partner per year. In doing so, she discovered that most graduating seniors reported having had only one hookup per semester, half of which were with previous hookup partners.

A key component of current hookup culture is emotional detachment: Rather than fulfill a need for sexual satisfaction, hookups have begun to serve a more social role and occupy an important place in the college party scene.

Let me suggest that college-bound high schoolers add one more item to their collegiate checklist:

Apps like Tinder are a symptom of gender imbalance in the dating market. He, in turn, is baffled by her unwillingness to carry on a casual affair. Given the shortage of young men in post-World War I Europe — 10 million soldiers died and 20 million were wounded, many grievously — Bernard wonders why any bachelor would want to settle down. In , 34 percent more women than men graduated from American colleges, and the U. Department of Education expects this gap to reach 47 percent by The imbalance has spilled over into the post-college dating scene.

In other words, the dating pool for straight, millennial, college graduates has four women for every three men. When there are plenty of marriageable men, dating culture emphasizes courtship and romance, and men generally must earn more to attract a wife. But when gender ratios skew toward women, as they do today among college grads, the dating culture becomes more sexualized.

The good news, at least according to the work of psychologists and sex-ratio pioneers Marcia Guttentag and Paul Secord , is that people tend to have better sex when ratios skew female. Women frequently wind up being treated as sex objects, and men are more inclined to exercise the option to delay marriage and play the field.

But according to separate research by University of Pennsylvania economist Jeremy Greenwood and by UCLA sociologists Christine Schwartz and Robert Mare , educational intermarriage is less common today than at any point over the past half century.

College Hookups: A Culture or a Cult

New data shows they were wrong. But according to new data, these Christians are wrong. A sweeping new study conducted by sociologist Martin A. The answer seems to be a little thing called confirmation bias , which is the tendency of people to favor information that confirms their preconceived notions or beliefs. As this narrative penetrated Christian communities, every anecdote of a young person contracting an STD or impregnating their teenage girlfriend fit nicely into the larger story Christians were telling, and coincidently, using to generate fear, raise money and political power.

But there are several problems with the macro-narrative of moral decline.

Advertisement This very limited definition of sex prevents people from recognizing lesbian sex as real sex.

How They Met, Semi-public location dorm, frat house: Meanwhile, for college students, spring break remains prime time for hook-ups. Canadian researchers Maticka-Tyndale et al. Afterward, a second survey showed that a majority said, “Mission accomplished”: This may sound hasty, but, then, spring break is brief; vacationing students are horny and outgoing ; and alcohol is abundant. I smell like a minibar. Is this a hickey or a bruise?

Alcohol has always played a major role in casual sex and it continues to be key to hook-ups today. Canadian researchers Fisher, asked college students about alcohol and hook-ups. Compared with sober lovers, those who are drunk are substantially less likely to use contraception. Not to mention that as intoxication increases, erotic pleasure usually decreases.

Incidentally, alcohol lubricates not just young adult hook-ups but also a great deal of sex among lovers of all ages.

Casual sex and hookup culture on campus

Study “Hooking up” has long been used to describe easy, sleazy college sex. From panicked media headlines to concerned studies by the American Psychological Association , the “college hookup culture” has been painted as a recent and rampant moral epidemic. But could it all come down to a simple, vernacular misunderstanding?

Szalavitz’s latest book is Born for Love:

As a result of Southern cultural practices aka Southern hospitality , students attending the University of Texas tend to view hooking up positively. And at Columbia, a university molded by New York culture and its emphasis on self-reliance, hookups seem more taboo, a topic that few address frankly. In Austin, sweaty, intoxicated college-aged adults can be seen grinding at a certain Sixth Street bar every night, whispering enchanting accounts of things to come into their partners’ ears.

While some people might be seen casually occupying tables, blushing and laughing at the drunken tales exchanged, others hunt—metaphorically swiping right or left—for potential prey. At UT, hookup culture doesn’t stop at the doors of bars. It follows students back home and is further demonstrated by the candidness with which UT students regard hookups. Naturally, at a school with an approximate population of 51, students —almost twice that of Columbia 30, —hookup culture feels more prevalent.

There’s simply a greater number of opportunities for hookups at UT. But mere numbers aren’t the only reason to believe that the hookup culture at UT is more open than at Columbia. Hookups are a kind of social capital at UT. Casual sex struts around in public, personified by the energetic student organizations engaging head-on with casual sex by actively distributing condoms of various colors and flavors.

College women, how do you feel about the college dating scene and hookup culture

Photo by Ellen Gwin Burnette Dr. In spite of the extensive research on hookup culture, there is limited data on how lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer LGBTQ students navigate hookups on college campuses. Their study indicates that, while LGBTQ students are actively working to remake hookup culture, and, in some ways, are succeeding, barriers to a more mindful hookup culture remain, even among those who explicitly seek new ways to pursue sexual relationships. By participating in this study as a research assistant, Kahn said she was able to learn much more about the research process than what can be obtained in the classroom.

Initially endowed by a generous gift from Hughlene and Bill Frank, the College of Arts and Sciences Student and Faculty Excellence SAFE Fund provides resources that can be used to transform the undergraduate and graduate experience and support faculty teaching, research and engagement. The department is also home to Watauga Residential College, an interdisciplinary, alternative general education program.

How would you describe the way the University looked at your course when it was first introduced in and now?

Look at these three statements and ask yourself which might be correct: Students on US campuses today are more sexually active than those of previous generations. They have more sexual partners than their counterparts before them. Statistics on the college hookup culture reveal that only one of the three statements is correct. Students are not as sexually active as people think they are, and they are not having more partners than students from earlier periods.

In fact, there might just be more sexually inactive people on campuses these days. Well, it is a sort of umbrella term for a range of casual-sex activity from making out to intercourse. As part of the research for the book, she identified four types of students with some interesting statistics on sex on campus: Each of these groups thrived, survived, or made their own peace with the hard-to-escape hook-up culture on their campuses.

Students were also not having sex more frequently or having more sexual partners as the media seems to say.


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